Of Machines and Men (Part II)

 

I observed last week that machines are increasingly shaping the nature of medicine; rather than medicine using its machines, its machines are starting to “use” medicine, to shape and direct the nature of medicine and adapt medical practice to the nature and methods of the machine. In this process, human activity absorbs the ethos and rhythms of the machine. Machines are all about efficiency, standardization, precision, data, and automation. Is this not becoming characteristic of the practice of medicine?

In medicine, “Efficiency” appears to be the watchword and underlying criterion for more and more decisions. The term “industry,” which previously one never would have used in the same sentence as the word “medical,” has become an accurate representation. Interactions between “medical consumers” and “providers” are increasingly mediated through machines. Leaders in medicine strive for standardization, automation, the effacement of individual practice variations, and centralization. Specialization is ever-increasing, and specialists with more techniques and machines to offer are valued more highly (and reimbursed more handsomely) than generalists who are the masters of less technology. Health care workers have reached the point where they can not practice without their gadgets. Practice quality is measured only by what is quantifiable; data, information, seems to have become the primary distinguishing characteristic of medicine, over and above relationship. Medical ethics is being reduced to machine-like process; content has become almost irrelevant. Technology is used more and more in an attempt to eradicate all ambiguity, imprecision, and uncertainty. Technology is used more and more simply because the technology exists. Both physicians and patients feel the increasingly machine-like nature of medical practice, even if they can not express it as such: patients complain of the impersonalization, sterilization, and dehumanization of medicine, while doctors feel more and more like cogs in a machine.

Efficiency is the end-all and be-all of machine medicine;  eliminating inefficient means becomes part of the grand project. And who in our time quibbles with eliminating inefficiency? The problem is compounded when the efficiency value system is applied not just to medicine, but to the humans it was meant to serve, when those patients who are considered “less efficient” are eliminated as blithely as last year’s smartphone. It happens now in the unborn, with prenatal genetic diagnosis identifying those “less efficient” humans who are then prevented from being born; it happens in the older and disabled, with euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide removing those who are too sick or old to be of use to themselves or others. Where will it be applied next?

To remain a human profession, medicine must regain and retain its human ethos . . . which, is why ethics is so central to its practice. In a future post I will consider some ways to resist the usurping of the essence of medicine by the efficient principle of the machine.

 

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Melika Hannah
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Melika Hannah

As I was reading your post I was thinking about how much we are moving our life styles towards machinery as we advance ourselves in technology. Human interactions are gradually fading away and “virtual interaction” is replacing them. For instance, now a days, more people are taking courses online which do not require their physical appearances in real classrooms. A few months ago, I was doing a research and I came across a website designed by a doctor. Members had access to his professional advices online by paying a monthly premium. This doctor’s main target was the group of patients… Read more »